“The Simpsons” tackles hydraulic fracturing

“Fracking?! That sounds like scary Lisa language!” – Homer Simpson

 

In its 26th and final season, The Simpsons isn’t finished fighting yet. The show continues to push (and frequently mock) the boundaries of distributor Fox, addressing hot-button issues like natural gas extraction through hydraulic fracturing.

In S26Ep5, Homer must endure hosting his despised sisters-in-law, Patty and Selma, and installs smoke detectors all over the house to catch the chain smokers damaging the kids’ lungs. They seek refuge in the bathroom – turning on the sink for a cover – and when they light up – BOOM! The bathroom explodes, and Lisa starts digging into why their house’s water would catch on fire.

Lisa pulls out her tablet and flips through a list of depressing environmental documentaries she’s seen before settling on a “Simpsonsfied” version of Josh Fox’s Gasland.

Lisa Simpson is a great viewer of tense environmental issue films

Lisa Simpson is a great viewer of tense environmental issue films

Lisa finds out it’s none other than C. Montgomery Burns behind the fracking, and writes her favorite State Assemblywoman, Maxine Lumbard (voiced by Jane Fonda), who goes after “his exxxcccelency” Burns. In turn, Burns gives Homer a promotion and a flannel shirt to convince the community why they should sell their mineral rights so Burns can continue fracking under their neighborhood.

Throughout the episode, however, Marge is heavily hit by the scary thought of what fracking has done to her family’s water. Her refrain: “Our water was on fire.”

Ignoring the lure of money, the hype of creating jobs, and even the detailed explanations of Professor (HOIYVEN-KLAYVEN) Frink, Marge saves her family from a fracking-induced earthquake, and convinces Homer to heed the omen of flammable water:

The episode, “Opposites A-Frack” is a strong reminder that sometimes the clear signs of unnatural balance are hard to ignore – even if they must be shouted over an earthquake caused by blasting rock formations with water to squeeze out drops of profit. Fracking has dangerous and unknown consequences – even Homer Simpson gets it.

Watch the full episode on Hulu

Exclusive Interview – Tanya Petersen

Tanya Peterson:

Thinking Out of the Box: How can Film and Television deal with “hot” issues like climate change?

Tanya Peterson is a former Co-President of Filmmakers for Conservation. 

She helped found ClimateWorks Australia, served as the Head of TV and Film for WFF International in Geneva for eight years, and is currently the head of Marketing for the The Gold Standard Foundation, “a certification organization pioneering Results Based Finance approaches to clean energy deployment, conservation and broader development.”

On Coal River

Description:

Coal River Valley, West Virginia is a community surrounded by lush mountains and a looming toxic threat. ON COAL RIVER follows a former miner and his neighbors in a David-and-Goliath struggle for the future of their valley, their children, and life as they know it.

Ed Wiley once worked at the same coal waste facility that now threatens his
granddaughter’s elementary school. When his local government refuses to act, Ed embarks on a quest to have the school relocated to safer ground. With insider knowledge and a sharp sense of right and wrong, Ed confronts his local school board, the state government, and a notorious coal company – Massey Energy – for putting his granddaughter and his community at risk.

Along the way, Ed is supported by his neighbors Bo and Judy, who are locked in their own battle with Massey Energy over their practice of “mountaintop removal” – blowing up mountains to extract coal. Together, Bo and Judy help Ed bring attention to the dangers at Marsh Fork Elementary, hoping that if they save the school, they can save the valley.

Positive results:

ON COAL RIVER is proud to have contributed to greater public awareness and policy maker scrutiny on the issues of mountaintop removal and coal slurry injection. The film screened in the US Capitol June 24 2010, sponsored by two members of Congress. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) personnel with authority over mountaintop removal were in the audience and said afterwards they were quite impacted by the film. One mining regulator commented that the film “hit him in the gut.”

ON COAL RIVER elicited public statements about mountaintop removal from celebrities Josh Lucas, Gloria Reuben, Woody Harrelson, and Hugh Jackman. Gloria Reuben personally gave her copy of ON COAL RIVER to Lisa Jackson, head of the US EPA. Shortly after our AFI/Discovery Channel – SILVERDOCS premiere, we helped facilitate an ongoing collaboration between Coal River Valley schools and the prestigious Sidwell School of Washington, DC, where President Obama’s daughters attend school.

In addition to the film, many non-profit organizations and individual activists have done a tremendous amount of work on the issue in the last few years. Although mountaintop removal has not yet been outlawed, the EPA is regulating the practice more closely, and a West Virginia state ban on the practice of underground slurry injection will soon be up for a vote.

Contact/Links:

Directors: Adams Wood and Francine Cavanaugh, Downriver Media
775 Haywood Road, Suite F, Asheville, NC 28806 USA
P: 1 (828) 230-7315,
E: info@oncoalriver.com
Web:
www.oncoalriver.com
www.facebook.com/oncoalriver
www.twitter.com/oncoalriver
www.vimeo.com/oncoalriver

By Jason Peters

Code of Best Practices in Sustainable Filmmaking

In 2008 FFC worked with the American University in Washington DC to develop the Code of Best Practice in Sustainable Filmmaking. While there were already ‘green’ filmmaking guides available, few, maybe none, were developed through detailed research or submitted to peer review. Thanks to support from The Ford Foundation and WWF UK, authors Larry Engel and Andrew Buchanan, both FFC members, were able to research and write the Code and put it through the review process. The principles in the Code are the basis on which checklists and carbon trackers were developed to help filmmakers reduce their carbon emissions and their damage to the environment.

It can get crowded out there!

It can get crowded out there!