Ancient Forests: Rage Over Trees

Ancient Forest: Rage Over Trees

Ancient Forest: Rage Over Trees

Description:

In 1989, Chris Palmer and Jim Lipscombe made Ancient Forests: Rage Over Trees for the National Audubon Society and Turner Broadcasting. It was hosted by actor Paul Newman and highlighted a protracted battle over logging on publicly owned forests in the United States. At issue were 3 million acres of ancient, or old-growth, forests in the Northwest that were being clear-cut at the rate of 60,000 acres a year-and the fate of the 30,000 workers who made their living by cutting them.

When advance word got out about the film’s content, it led to a logging-industry boycott of the corporate sponsors, all of whom pulled their support for the film in the face of big-industry intimidation. But Ted Turner broadcast the film anyway. To him, and to those like Palmer and Lipscombe who had created the film, conservation was more important than making money. Articles about the controversy appeared in major newspapers all across the country.

Positive results:

The film played a pivotal role in convincing the U.S. Forest Service not to log a beautiful Oregon watershed called Opal Creek, full of centuries-old fir, hemlock, and cedar. Audubon and Turner lost a lot of money, but saved a forest. Thanks to the film, Opal Creek was eventually designated as a wilderness area and thus firmly protected from logging.

Other Achievements:

In 1993, author David Seideman wrote a lengthy book of investigative journalism called Showdown at Opal Creek in which he spent several years interviewing all the key people involved in the controversy. Seideman’s book made the case convincingly that it was the documentary Ancient Forests: Rage Over Trees which was seminal in leading to the federal legislation protecting Opal Creek. It wouldn’t have happened without the film.

Contact/Links:

Host: Paul Newman
Producer: James Lipscomb
Producer: John Lipscomb
Executive Producer: Chris Palmer

Email: palmer@american.edu Web: http://www.american.edu/soc/cef/
National Audubon Society: http://www.audubon.org/
Turner Broadcasting System: http://turner.com/
Ted Turner: http://www.tedturner.com/home.asp

Online references: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1815587/
http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/audubon_video_ancient_forests_rage_over_trees/#want_to_see
http://tv.nytimes.com/show/40036/Ancient-Forests-Rage-Over-Trees/overview
http://tv.yahoo.com/ancient-forests-rage-over-trees/show/2403/castcrew
http://www.locatetv.com/tv/world-of-audubon/1201293
http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/video/for10.html

By Jason Peters

Amazon Sells Whale Meat

Description:

Language: English

Running time: 52 seconds

Conceived as a short, high-impact campaign film with the potential to go viral, Amazon Sells Whale Meat accompanied the release of the Environmental Investigation Agency report Amazon.com’s Unpalatable Profits on February 21, 2012.

The film is loosely structured after the opening sequence of 1974’s The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, replacing the high-pitched sound of a camera flashbulb recharging with a burst of whale song as a prelude to footage of the bloody reality of whaling, juxtaposing images of a mother and daughter viewing Amazon Japan pages of seemingly innocuous cetacean food products with images including the killing of pilot whales in the Taiji drive hunt and a fin whale being landed in Iceland.

Positive results:

Within hours of the campaign’s launch, the film was viewed thousands of times via a multitude of internet news sites and blogs, Facebook and Twitter which either embedded the film or linked to it.

Helping to spur tens of thousands of consumers to take action by protesting directly to Amazon and its CEO Jeff Bezos via emails, a petition, Tweets and postings on Amazon’s Facebook page, the film played a key role in speedily raising awareness of both the issue and the campaign.

In less than 24 hours, Amazon had contacted the vendors of cetacean products on Amazon Japan and all products were withdrawn.

Video Success: Amazon Removes Whale Meat

Contact/Links:

Produced by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA International)

Edited/Directed – Paul Redman
Written – Paul Newman
Website: http://www.eia-international.org
EIA Action Alert: http://www.eia-international.org/action-alert-tell-amazon-to-ban-all-whale-products
See ‘Amazon whale meat campaign: going behind the scenes: http://www.eia-international.org/amazon-whale-meat-campaign-behind-the-scenes

By Jason Peters

Elephants Without Borders

Title: Elephants Without Borders

Description:

Elsewhere in Africa elephants are in decline, but Botswana has an overpopulation problem with over 150,000. A pre-emptive cull of over 60,000 has been suggested. Dr. Mike Chase’s research finds real and meaningful solutions to Botswana’s problem. Chase is discovering their ancient migration routes, now blocked by expanding human settlement, and is lobbying the governments of neighboring counties to open gaps for safe passage.

Previously unrecorded annual gatherings, numbering over 5000 elephants, suggests an elephant intellect far more complex than previously imagined. Dr Chase believes that these clan gatherings reinforce bonds between family groups and that survival strategies are shared.

The film reveals new science about elephant movements and home range sizes. Chase tracks a bull elephant with an astounding home range of 35,000 sq kilometres – the largest ever recorded for an African elephant. Female home range sizes are discovered to be nearly five times the previously accepted average of 3000 square kilometres.

Bull elephants living in the Makgadigadi salt pans are filmed for the first time as Mike discovers how they survive in the hostile desert.

In the end the film reveals the solution: Chase has identified corridors that will allow Angola’s refugee elephants to return home after 30 years of civil war.

Positive results:

As documented by Dr. Mike Chase of Elephants Without Borders Organisation (“EWB”):

The film helped open dialogue between five African countries and has had a direct impact on elephant conservation in Botswana and beyond. The film has:

  • Provided EWB with an audience with the Botswana Government, who then provided EWB with funding to conduct the first independent aerial survey of elephants (and other wildlife) in the Botswana.
  • Boosted the profile of elephant conservation in KAZA (Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier), the world’s largest conservation area straddling Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The film has been viewed by the Government Departments in the five countries charged with formalising KAZA.
  • Aided EWB in securing funding from Conservation Agencies in the amount of US$50 000.00, all of which has been ploughed back into elephant conservation and the KAZA Transfronteir Conservation area.
  • Helped secure funding for EWB’s conservation farming project, in which EWB are researching techniques to keep elephants out of farmlands and thus reduce human elephant conflict.
  • Brought awareness which helped prioritise conservation corridors and areas to initially de-mine in South-eastern Angola in collaboration with the Angolan government and MgM demining company.
  • Created dialogue amongst decision makers on the decommissioning and re-alignment of Botswana’s Vet Fences.
  • Increased awareness amongst the youth about elephant conservation in Botswana.

Contact/Links:

Produced by AFRISCREEN FILMS for BBC NATURAL WORLD
Producers: Tania “TJ’ Jenkins & Mike Holding
http://www.afriscreen.com/elephants-without-borders.html
Series Producer: Tim Martin BBC NHU
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00hhf6f
For more detailed information about the Project and Mike Chase’s work, please visit: http://www.elephantswithoutborders.org

By Jason Peters

Broken Wings & Vanishing Vultures

Title: Broken Wings & Vanishing Vultures

Description:

The world’s most devastating extinction is happening in India. The Indian sub-continent had the highest density of vultures in the world – 85 million in total. However, over the past few years the vast majority have disappeared. Masters of the skies, vultures, the greatest, most efficient scavengers have disappeared forever. More than 99% of the vultures in the sub-continent are dead with roughly three to four thousand remaining. The loss of such an important scavenger has had devastating effects – Putrefying decomposing carcasses are thought to be the cause of anthrax and rabies outbreaks. The extinction of this species
would have global health consequences.

The use of an ordinary veterinary drug, Diclofenac, is the reason behind the kill-off, having driven the vulture to near complete extinction.

These films were made to highlight the problem and bring it to the attention of the public and politicians, using footage shot by Mike Pandey and his team over the past 30 years.

Positive results:

The films were premiered at the British Council in March 2006 and have since been broadcast in 15 different languages on the national network, along with special screenings for the Prime Minister and other key politicians. There was an immediate reaction from the public and national press. The films also appealed to farmers, and many, previously unaware of the problem, switched to a safer alternative to the drug.

These conservation films have been crucial in banning the killer drug diclofenac from the sub-continent… They moved the government of India into bringing in legislation. On May 11th 2006 the Drug Controller General of India issued a notification to all the state drug controllers to ban, with immediate effect, the production and the sale of the veterinary drug diclofenac. This is a crucial step which will give the remaining 1% of vultures a new lease of life and a fighting chance for survival.

Kiran Choudhry, Minister of State for Forests, Tourism and Cultural Affairs, Government of Haryana, Chandigarh stated: “Broken Wings & Vanishing Vultures was a brilliant tool for advocacy and this success proves once again how powerful films can be. It was central to the advocacy efforts as it spoke from the heart and touched all those who saw it.”

Contact/Links:

Executive Producer/Cameraman/Narrator: Mike Pandey
Director: Ritambra Rana
Address: C-18, Chirag Enclave, New Delhi – 110048, India
Phone: +91 11 26410684/26216508 Fax: +91 11 26216508
www.riverbankstudios.com/doc_brokenwings.htm
Email: wildlife@vsnl.com or info@riverbankstudios.com
Earth Matters Foundation: www.earthmattersfoundation.org

By Jason Peters

Borneo’s Pygmy Elephants

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXtVSSStymo

Description:

Borneo’s pygmy forest elephants were once believed to be a feral population derived from domesticated imported Asian elephants, but DNA testing has confirmed they are a unique subspecies, who’ve lived on Borneo for at least 300,000 years.

This film tells the story of forest guide, Bert Dausip, observing and befriending the
elephants. His daily deep-jungle expeditions reward him with some of the most intimate and close up encounters with forest elephants ever filmed. Bert discovers one year old Fig and his elephant family living in the forests alongside the Kinabatangan River, in northeastern Sabah.

In befriending these elephants Bert has discovered that Pygmy elephants are far gentler than anyone could have ever imagined. They aren’t the aggressive killers that people think they are. Even females with newborns accept his presence.

Bert is probably the only person in the world who can track down and observe forest elephants in their wild forest home on a daily basis. This in itself is a spectacular accomplishment, but little did Bert know that once he collected the DNA samples for science his familiarity with the pygmy elephants would become crucial to an action plan to save these remarkable animals and their habitat.

Positive results:

Borneo’s pygmy forest elephants were once believed to be a feral population derived from domesticated imported Asian elephants, but DNA testing has confirmed they are a unique subspecies, who’ve lived on Borneo for at least 300,000 years.

This film tells the story of forest guide, Bert Dausip, observing and befriending the
elephants. His daily deep-jungle expeditions reward him with some of the most intimate and close up encounters with forest elephants ever filmed. Bert discovers one year old Fig and his elephant family living in the forests alongside the Kinabatangan River, in northeastern Sabah.

In befriending these elephants Bert has discovered that Pygmy elephants are far gentler than anyone could have ever imagined. They aren’t the aggressive killers that people think they are. Even females with newborns accept his presence.

Bert is probably the only person in the world who can track down and observe forest elephants in their wild forest home on a daily basis. This in itself is a spectacular accomplishment, but little did Bert know that once he collected the DNA samples for science his familiarity with the pygmy elephants would become crucial to an action plan to save these remarkable animals and their habitat.

Contact/Links:

Director: Joe Kennedy
Producer: Michael Patrick Wong
Executive Producer: Ellen Windemuth
Production Company: Michael Patrick Wong & Off the Fence

Buy the DVD: http://www.amazon.com/Borneos-Pygmy-Elephants-seen-Discover/dp/B0027VD3OU

By Jason Peters

– Films That Made a Difference

Title: Ancient Forests: Rage Over Trees

RageOverTrees

Description:

In 1989, Chris Palmer and Jim Lipscombe made Ancient Forests: Rage Over Trees for the National Audubon Society and Turner Broadcasting. It was hosted by actor Paul Newman and highlighted a protracted battle over logging on publicly owned forests in the United States. At issue were 3 million acres of ancient, or old-growth, forests in the Northwest that were being clear-cut at the rate of 60,000 acres a year-and the fate of the 30,000 workers who made their living by cutting them.

When advance word got out about the film’s content, it led to a logging-industry boycott of the corporate sponsors, all of whom pulled their support for the film in the face of big-industry intimidation. But Ted Turner broadcast the film anyway. To him, and to those like Palmer and Lipscombe who had created the film, conservation was more important than making money. Articles about the controversy appeared in major newspapers all across the country.

Positive results:

The film played a pivotal role in convincing the U.S. Forest Service not to log a beautiful Oregon watershed called Opal Creek, full of centuries-old fir, hemlock, and cedar. Audubon and Turner lost a lot of money, but saved a forest. Thanks to the film, Opal Creek was eventually designated as a wilderness area and thus firmly protected from logging.

Other Achievements:

In 1993, author David Seideman wrote a lengthy book of investigative journalism called Showdown at Opal Creek in which he spent several years interviewing all the key people involved in the controversy. Seideman’s book made the case convincingly that it was the documentary Ancient Forests: Rage Over Trees which was seminal in leading to the federal legislation protecting Opal Creek. It wouldn’t have happened without the film.

Contact/Links:

Host: Paul Newman
Producer: James Lipscomb
Producer: John Lipscomb
Executive Producer: Chris Palmer

Email: palmer@american.edu Web: http://www.american.edu/soc/cef/
National Audubon Society: http://www.audubon.org/

Online references: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1815587/
http://tv.nytimes.com/show/40036/Ancient-Forests-Rage-Over-Trees/overview
http://tv.yahoo.com/ancient-forests-rage-over-trees/show/2403/castcrew
http://www.locatetv.com/tv/world-of-audubon/1201293
http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/video/for10.html

By Jason Peters