The Need to Move

Description:

Produced by Conservation Media for The Wolverine Foundation, this short film explores one of the most fascinating and least understood animals on the planet. This small, rare, and elusive creature may be able to kill a moose or fend a grizzly off a kill, but it faces serious threats such as climate change for which it is no match.

The Wolverine Foundation recognizes the need for a coordinated science-based effort to elevate the wolverine’s management status through support and initiation of research, and to develop an information network for professional and public education.

Positive results:

Education and awareness online. Further information unknown yet.

Contact/Links:

Director/Producer: Jeremy Roberts
Email: jroberts@conservationmedia.com
Websites: www.conservationmedia.com
http://wolverinefoundation.org/
Link to film: http://conservationmedia.com/2010/11/12/wolverine-foundation/

By Jason Peters

 

The Drill Project

Description:

The Drill Project features the first-ever broadcast images of wile Bioko Island drills; large, silver baboon-like monkeys with obsidian black faces, and dominant males with bright blue rears and red genitals. An educational film, The Drill Project illustrates the beautiful relationships formed in the biodiversity of Bioko Island’s tropical forests, and explains how the drills are an important part of their ecosystem. Viewers learn, however, that not all is well in these forests, as traditional bush-meat hunting practices have given way to commercial poaching with shotguns and snare traps. The Drill Project gives a voice to the drills and the six other species of monkeys on the island by exhibiting these lesser-known primates’ struggle with human misunderstanding and advocating the abolishment of primate hunting on the island.

The film includes interviews with local community members and biologists discussing the importance of wildlife protection to serve future generations and its economic value to the country of Equatorial Guinea. The film is in Spanish, the national language of Equatorial Guinea, and narrated by Demetrio Bocuma Meñe an Equatoguinean who studies environmental science and policy in the United States. Our message is a positive one and it is meant to give the local public of Equatorial Guinea a national pride in their wildlife.


Positive results
:

The Drill Project is currently broadcasting on the National and International television channels in Equatorial Guinea and premiered both in Equatorial Guinea (December 15, 2012) at the Guinean Cultural Center in Malabo and in the USA (April 15, 2013) at Drexel University in Philadelphia. In March of 2013 we organized film screenings in three villages near the protected areas where the last drills remain, and we left a group of biology students from the local Universidad Nacional de Guinea Equatorial in charge of continuing to organize showings of the film. The Drill Project has aired in schools, village centers, and living rooms to ignite conversation about the bushmeat trade. The head of the biology of UNGE is a friend of President Teodoro Obiang and claims that the president has seen and approves of the film.

Contact/Links:

Watch the Film: http://www.thedrillproject.org/the-film/
Director, Producer, and First Camera: Justin Jay: justindavidjay@gmail.com, (843) 991-3442, thedrillproject.org
Producer: Shaya Hornavar: sh333@drexel.edu, (215) 667-4515,
Editor: Megan Pollin
Narrator: Demetrio Bocuma Meñe

By Jason Peters

SOS – Save Our Sholas

Description:

This pro bono film, put together mainly from the filmmaker’s 20 year archive and contributions from filmmaker Suresh Elamon, depicts the stunning biodiversity of the rain forests of India’s Western Ghats mountain range, and underlines their tremendous watershed value to hundreds of millions of people in South India. It also shows the devastation caused by mining, dams, plantations and resource extraction on this fragile landscape. Originally produced in English and Hindi, DVDs of the film have been distributed to 10,000 schools across India. Subsequently, the film was also translated into Tamil and is being screened extensively by several NGOs at various fora in South India, to raise public awareness about the vital lifeline provided by the ‘shola’ forests that clothe the southern Western Ghats.

Positive results:

Unknown to date.

Contact/Links:

Producer: Shekar Dattatri
Duration: 25 minutes
Format: 16mm/MINI DV
Country: India
Production Year:2008
www.shekardattatri.com
http://www.pressreleasepoint.com/sossave-our-sholas-film-conservation-western-ghatsindia

By Jason Peters

SAW: This Time, It’s for Real

Description:

“It’s the latest installment in the horrifying (but thankfully fictional) SAW movie saga…Or is it? Set against an eerie and remote African landscape, this sadistic killing spree is unlike any other and the helpless victims have nowhere left to hide. Because this time…it’s for real.”

Southern Africa’s rhino’s are disappearing at a rate of approximately 1 every 30 hours. This dire situation has truly become similar to the ruthless killing and bloodshed witnessed in commercial horror movies.

Earth Touch Productions who made this film for the benefit of the Stop Rhino Poaching online campaign, the film objectives include:
” To encourage continued public awareness and support as part of a committed and extensive media drive by StopRhinoPoaching.com.
” To rally financial backing from both corporate and private donors, the proceeds of which will be put towards implementing rhino protection projects in South Africa. All donor funding will be managed by members within the Rhino Chamber of Wildlife Ranching South Africa, a non-profit organisation that represents game ranchers as a national body in South Africa.

Positive results:

Unknown to date.

Contact/Links:

Earthtouch productions.
4 Sunbury Crescent, Sunbury Park, La Lucia Ridge, 4051, South Africa, P O Box 1437, Umhlanga, 4320.
www.earth-touch.com
www.stoprhinopoaching.com
Email: media@stoprhinopoaching.com

By Jason Peters

Solving Human-Elephant Conflicts at Thuma Forest Reserve, Malawi – Baby Elephant Killed by Poachers

Description:

Villagers along the boundaries of Thuma Forest Reserve in Malawi were increasingly facing problems with crop-raiding elephants which have led to 2 people and 1 elephant being killed in 2009. Although people are aware of the benefits coming to their communities through the “Thuma Ecosystem Rehabilitation Project”, is the permanent human-wildlife conflict affecting the local participation and support of WAG’s conservation efforts at Thuma.

There was an immediate need for action to protect both the elephants and at the same time the property and live of the local communities.

As an emergency measure, a section of the required fence has been installed and completed in November 2009 by the Wildlife Action Group International e.V. on behalf of the District Assembly of Salima.

The local farmers contributed with incredible hard workmanship to finish installing this section of the fence before the rainy season.
What has been achieved to date:
” Installation of a section of 12 km of solar powered electric fence
” Construction of an entrance gate
” Construction of 18 km access roads and tracks
” Construction of two small houses for fence attendants
” Training of fencing and maintenance personnel
” Temporary employment for local people: 3140 man-days

The now installed elephant fence-section allows the local people to reoccupy about 950 hectare of agriculture land, which they had abandoned because of the crop raiding elephants!

Positive results:

This film raises awareness and encourages donations to enable continuation of the conservation programme.

Contact/Links:

Chairman: Georg Kloeble
Wildlife Action Group International e.V.
Pfaelzer Strasse 22
D-83109 Grosskarolinenfeld
Germany
Skype: waginternational
Email: info@wildlifeactiongroup.org
Website: http://www.africanconservation.org
Link to film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNttZ6fg80o&feature=player_embedded

By Jason Peters

Open Space

Description:

Produced for Sonoran Institute, this film examines land use and the loss of open space, wildlife habitat, and food security.

The nonprofit Sonoran Institute, founded in 1990, works across the rapidly changing West to conserve and restore natural and cultural assets and to promote better management of growth and change. The Institute’s community-based approach emphasizes collaboration, civil dialogue, sound information, local knowledge, practical solutions and big-picture thinking.

Positive results:

Unknown to date.

Contact/Links:

Director/Producer: Jeremy Roberts
Email: jroberts@conservationmedia.com
Websites: www.conservationmedia.com
www.sonoranatsonoraninstitute.org

By Jason Peters

Our Blue – The Tank Bangers

Description:

How on earth did a bunch of diving instructors decide that enough is enough and we want our say? Well… It started in Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt. Sitting on the edge of the stunning Red Sea. Home to one of the natural wonders of the world. Home of the Ras Mohammed National Park. The people involved so far are from all walks of life. Previously lorry drivers, IT engineers, bankers, soldiers, nurses etc etc, all enjoying their new lives as diving instructors and guides.

And then something happened. In December 2010 a series of shark attacks changed the world. For us and for them. There are many reasons why these attacks happened. We promise you this much – it is not because sharks are evil. Drop that thought RIGHT NOW. But the world’s media went shark hunting mad. And the tourism industry in Egypt took a massive hit. And in all honesty – this really upset us. But it did mean that due to a lack of work – we had a huge amount of time on our hands. Along with a large number of tanks. Ripe for banging.
Then on one quiet sunny afternoon a few staff did a fun dive and decided to make an underwater music video. A spoof. Nothing more. Something fun to pass the time. They filmed a crazy comedy version of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody”. And people that had never dived before – that had never snorkelled before – really liked it.. Yet while we laughed at our own antics we realised something.. “Why don’t we write our own song. A song about the blue. And why we love her. A song that shows the world how it could be. A song that shows the world what we have done. And a song that shows the world we must change our ways. So we did.

It is our message to the world. It is your song. It is our song. Because it is our blue. And all we want you to do is sing. Because everyone deep down loves to. It is so much fun. And singing when we know it’s for a reason greater than ourselves – is even better. So WE are going to sing. For you. For us. For our world. And it’s about time.

The first music video filmed entirely underwater. Performed in English – the film has also been subtitled in 20 languages in order to reach a greater number of people. Only 5 minutes long – it took approximately 600 dives, 1000 takes and 10 months to make.7 minutes long. It has taken hundred of dives and thousands of takes. It has cost us a small fortune and most of our sanity. But it is done. We hope you enjoy it. We hope you get behind us. There is much yet to do. Please share it and please buy it. Sing it far and wide. This is our chance to sing for our oceans. It is time to go BOOM.

Positive results:

The proceeds from the sale of the song will be given to the organisations shown @ 5:40.

http://www.projectaware.org/givesharksachance
http://www.sharkproject.org
http://www.wwf.org
http://www.pretoma.org
http://www.seashepherd.org
http://www.unitedconservationists.org
http://www.marinemegafauna.org
http://www.cancerresearchuk.org

We are the fastest growing, most enthusiastic and darn right dangerous group of oceanic conservationists currently not in an asylum.

Our vision is crystal clear – we want to “Promote, Inspire and Educate” a better knowledge and understanding of the intricate and delicate machine that is our oceans by utilising music, comedy and social media to encourage more cooperation and unity between divers, ocean lovers and other marine focused conservation groups to really get the increasingly desperate cry of our oceans heard.

Our first major project “Our Blue” is a song and a video designed to portray the beauty and fragility of the ocean and convey how we are mistreating and neglecting her. Available for purchase on line from various outlets, with the song “Our Blue”, it is our intention to raise money to donate to selected marine conservation groups and organisations that will, we hope, enable them to continue the great work they are doing for our oceans.

Beyond “Our Blue” we have a myriad of ideas and projects in mind that are also designed to raise awareness and funds to support many more marine conservation organisations and initiatives both locally and globally including our own.

Our strength and effectiveness comes from our individual members who are continually proving that by combining our shared passion there is no measure to what can be accomplished for our oceans, their life and ultimately our own future.

Contact/Links:

Nick Stec: nick.stec@thetankbangers.org
Nick is an underwater cinematographer based in Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt.
Website: http://www.thetankbangers.org/
View on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5HXyOgz2YA
Join in on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/groups/TheTankBangers/
Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/the_tankbangers
Help support the Tank Bangers and visit their shop!
http://tankbangersshop.spreadshirt.co.uk/

By Jason Peters

The Ridley’s Last Stand

Olive Ridley Turtle

Description:

Three secluded beaches in Orissa, on the east coast of India play host to an extraordinary natural drama. On certain nights between January and May, when the south wind blows fiercely, tens of thousands of female olive Ridley’s climb ashore to lay over a hundred eggs each. The sun and sand incubate the eggs and approximately 45 days later they hatch under cover of darkness. This time millions of tiny hatchlings make their way in the opposite direction – towards the sea, where they will spend the rest of their lives. 10-15 years later, those that survive will return as mature adults to lay their eggs on the very beach where they were born. For as long as is known Ridley’s have been nesting on these beaches. As a species they have been around for millions of years, but today these gentle giants of the sea are in conflict with man. During the last decade alone over 100,000 adult olive Ridley’s have been killed accidentally by drowning in trawl and gill nets of mechanized fishing boats that ply these waters. With the fishing season coinciding with the migration of the turtles to Orissa for nesting, nets often contain more turtles than fish. Perhaps no other endangered species is being killed wantonly in such numbers anywhere else in the world.

THE RIDLEY’S LAST STAND is a poignant look at the lives and times of the Olive Ridley’s that visit Orissa, and provides new insights into the natural history and conservation of these mysterious creatures. A self-financed, pro bono film, it was completed in 2003 after two years of effort by the filmmaker.

Positive results:

Shown to key policy makers, conservation NGOs and the general public (through many public screenings), the film, which depicts both the problems and their solutions, resulted in a lot of awareness and some action, such as the Indian Coast Guard being given special powers to arrest mechanized fishing boats operating in ‘no fishing’ zones. However, due to a multitude of stakeholders and vested interests and absolutely no political will on the part of the Government of Orissa, there has been no lasting impact. Thousands of turtles continue to die needlessly every year.

Contact/Links:

Producer: Shekar Dattatri
Duration: 45 minutes
Format: MINI DV Country: India
Production Year: 2003
www.shekardattatri.com

By Jason Peters

Save Our Sharks A Save Our Seas Foundation

Description:

Save Our Sharks highlights the terrible price of tradition. Sharks are finned alive for a tasteless soup with no nutritional value. Once the privilege of only the affluent, new wealth in Asia has made shark fin soup more affordable. The high price of fins makes shark fishing very profitable and millions are slaughtered every year. Many species now face extinction. Life on earth relies on the sea. The ocean needs sharks: the killing must stop.
Running time: 6′ 16″

Save Our Sharks – aims to influence the next generation to open their eyes to the devastating cruelty and terrible waste caused by shark finning all in the name of tradition.

Positive results:

Save Our Sharks is part of the Save Our Seas short, ‘sticky’ film campaign. The film delivers a conservation message in a provocative way designed to vividly remain in the mind of the viewer. The film featured during European Shark week and has been shown at several festivals including Wavescape in Cape Town (SA surfer’s festival) and the Fuji Rock Festival in Japan attended by 180,000 people. It won a Panda award at the Wildscreen Film Festival and was part of the Save Our Seas campaign category entry that won a ‘Rocky’ award at Jackson Hole Film Festival.

Save Our Sharks has been provided to WWFHK (Hong Kong) and Wildaid to help with their campaign work. It has been translated into Mandarin for distribution in China.

China has banned shark fin soup at its’ official banquets. Save Our Sharks is part of a collective effort by conservationists that has made a difference in the battle against shark finning. See: China Bans Shark Fin Soup at Official Banquets

The Save Our Seas Foundation hope to continue campaigning with the film to reach as many viewers as possible and change a tradition that is having a serious negative effect on sharks worldwide.

Contact/Links:

Mandarin Version: https://vimeo.com/46685530
Producer: Caroline Brett – caroline@saveourseas.com
Director of Hong Kong sequences: Jo Ruxton
Camera: Dan Beecham, Tom Campbell, Dennis Coffman, Alex
Hofford, Paul Menge, Lesley Rochat & Wade Muller
Editor: Alan Miller
Save Our Seas Foundation: http://saveourseas.com/

By Jason Peters

We Don’t Kill Lions Anymore

Lionness and Cub

Description:

Language: Maa with English subtitles
Running time: 27 minutes

Lion Hunting was once a tradition in Maasai Culture Today with fewer than 200 wild Maasai lions left, the Maasai are now becoming their greatest protectors. This is an educational film made for the Maasai explaining how to participate in the exceptional conservation programme called the Predator Compensation Fund. This film – in coordination with the team of the Maasailand Preservation Trust, located in the 275,000 acre Mbirikani Game Ranch of Southern Kenya’s Chyulu Hills, Ol Donyo Wuas Trust and National Geographic Big Cat Initiative – forms an integral part of the education element of a well coordinated educational, reward and prevention programme that has dramatically halted the decline in lion and other predator numbers in this part of Kenya.

The film, narrated in the local language Maa, with English subtitles explains the workings of the Predator Compensation Fund, a fund that compensates Maasai if their livestock is killed by lion, cheetah, leopard or hyena. It encourages lion and Maasai to live together, with a strong disincentive in place to prevent rules being broken. The film is shown to each and every village in conjunction with their local community representative and liaison on hand to explain any uncertain areas and has had universal buy-in from the communities in the area.

Positive results:

On average 24 lions were killed each year in the 275,000 acre Maasai-owned Mbirikani Game Ranch (population around 10,000) before the Predator Compensation Fund (PCF) was introduced in this area in June 2003. After the scheme’s introduction just 4 lions were killed in total in a six year period. The PCF has expanded to neighbouring ranches in the Amboseli-Chyulu Hills area with similar dramatic reduction in lion deaths. Cattle are now corralled into sufficient, protective kraals to prevent predation. Lion Guardians, scouts employed to look out and radio in lion sitings prevent cattle from grazing close to where lions are known. Maasai are being educated to live along side wild animals and see the benefits tourism and conservation brings to their communities with greater education opportunities and reward. This film has, as an educational medium, significantly helped in the PCF scheme’s success. They don’t kill lions anymore.

Contact/Links:

Directed, Filmed and Edited by Kire Godal for National Geographic Big Cat Initiative and Ol Donyo Wuas Trust
Witten: Richard Bonham, Tom Hills
Websites:
http://natgeotv.com/uk/lion-warriors/videos/we-dont-kill-lions-anymore
http://www.maasailandpreservationtrust.com
http://www.greatplainsconservation.com

By Jason Peters